Past Capstone Symposia

2018 Capstone Symposium Award Winners

2018 Undergraduate Winners

CREATIVE WORK

Kristin Niizawa, “Rainbow State: A Collection of Cinemagraphs” (Integrated Multimedia)

 

INTERNSHIP/ PRACTICUM

Britney Largent & Michelle Manganello, “Gamifying the Language Classroom” (TESOL – Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages)

 

PROJECT

Eunice Seet, “What can we learn from Zika in Brazil?” (Public Health)

Rachel Camarin A. Gonzales, “Addressing the Mental Health of Male Prisoners in the United States” (Public Health)

Andrew Tang, “Opioids in Maternal and Child Health” (Public Health)

 

RESEARCH

Allison Carone, “Mind the Gap: Gender Parity in National Legislatures and Violence Against Women” (Political Science)

Cherise Spotkaeff, “Genomic Annotation of a Novel Thermophilic Virus from the Oceanic Basement” (Marine Biology)

 

 2018 Graduate Winners

 

INTERNSHIP/ PRACTICUM

Amanda Desmond, “Teaching Comedy as a Common Language in Middle Schoolers” (Education)

 

PROJECT

Sodbileg Chuluunbaatar, “Oahu Vehicle Parking Space Rental Website” (Information Systems)

 

RESEARCH

Michaela Arnett, “A Comparative Study of Factors Contributing to Substance Use: Military vs. Civilian Youth” (Social Work)

Sieun Kong, “The Role of Social Work in CSR: The Social Work Delphi Study” (Social Work)

 

 2018 Deans’ Awards

 

College of Business

Craig Riley, William Daywalt, Donald Indermuehle, & Craig Kandler, “City and County of Honolulu Emergency Call Center System Application” (Graduate, Information Systems, Project)

 

College of Health and Society

Lavon Petersen, “Qualitative Study on the Usage of Single Room Occupancies to House Severely Mentally Ill & Low-Income Homeless Individuals” (Undergraduate, Social Work, Research)

 

College of Liberal Arts

Gabriella Marzullo, “Bud & Daisy” (Undergraduate, Cinematic Production, Creative Work)

 

College of Natural and Computational Sciences

Kaylee Scidmore-Rossing, “Lasting Impressions: Determining total length of Galeocerdo cuvier tiger sharks using partial bite impressions in Hawaiian waters” (Undergraduate, Marine Biology, Research)

 

College of Professional Studies

Heather Delgado, “Improving Learning Effectiveness by Considering Learning Styles” (Graduate, Education, Research)

 

UNDERGRADUATE

1ST PLACE:

Malia L. Hanna, "Adolescents in crisis: Can increased awareness and access to resources help save lives?"
Abstract: The Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam / Military Family Support Center, strives to maximize the physical, emotional and social development of military members and their families. Recent program efforts have focused on preventing adolescent suicide. Per the Center for Disease Control and Injury Prevention, suicide is the second leading cause of death for youth between the ages of 10-24 (CDC,2014). School based suicide prevention programming such as gatekeeper trainings, suicide screenings, and curriculum based programming built to enhance coping skills, self-esteem, physical wellness and reduce bullying are currently being offered in the Hawaii schools where military youth attend. However, stigma surrounding suicide is a barrier to a youth’s ability to talk about suicide and seek help when in crisis. This capstone projects seeks to complement school based suicide prevention programs and support help seeking behaviors among youth at-risk. It includes designing and recommending a resource page with suicide prevention resources such as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline and other helpful links to local crisis intervention resources on school websites. The availability of suicide prevention resources on school websites can reduce stigma surrounding suicide and help to encourage students, parents, peers, or community members to independently seek help when crisis arises.

2ND PLACE:

Noel Hungerbuhler, "Aid in third world countries"
Abstract: My presentation will be about the controversy behind the aid third world countries receive, I want to give an in depth review on actually how much countries such as Africa specifically benefit from the additional help they may get. Does it make the situation worse or improve the situations going on in areas of need? It is important that the steps we take are actually leading to the crucial helpful path for regions in need to get on their feet and hopefully one day be equal counterparts to other superpowers of the world. If the aid we try to give does not actually benefit anyone, then what is the point of spending all this energy and manpower for a cause where the end results are bleak. We want to be productive, not counterproductive.

3RD PLACE:

Aalaya Carlesha Wheeler, "Exploring Housing Stability with a Permanent Housing Program: A Qualitative Semi-structured Study"
Abstract: Within the last seven years, on Oahu alone, the unsheltered population has increased to 40% and the sheltered population has decreased to 60% (City & County, 2015). Taking into consideration the pervasive nature of homelessness on Oahu, it is imperative that measures are taken to mitigate homelessness and opportunities are provided to individuals with disabling conditions. Thus, the purpose of this research seeks to identify the barriers to maintaining housing in the New Beginnings permanent housing program at Kalihi Palama Health Center, Health Care for The Homeless Project. The methodology for this research is a semi-structured qualitative study. Four participants were interviewed and asked 29 questions to understand factors that lead to an increase or decrease in housing stability. The results will depict potential areas of growth for the housing program, New Beginnings, and offer recommendations. This study seeks to understand why clients cannot maintain housing and are constantly rehoused.

EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION:

Morgen Trube, "The Power of Advocacy"
Abstract: My presentation will be about my internship experience from Fall 2016-Spring 2017 at Planned Parenthood Votes of the Great Northwest and Hawaiian Islands. Throughout my internship, I have done a lot of advocacy and legislative work at the local government here in Hawaii, as well as the Federal Government. I will be talking about how important it is to stand up for what you believe in, how to become an advocate as well as my past, current and ongoing work that I have been doing.

Savannah Miguel-Botelho, "Hawaii 5210 'Let’s Go!'"
Abstract: In this presentation, I will showcase my experience and involvement in my current practicum site at an organization called Hawaii 5210! and discuss what their initiative is within the community (keiki & family) and Hawaii school districts. This organization's goals are to promote healthy eating and active living and prevent childhood obesity through a collaborative effort in health education. I will describe an ongoing water promotion project as well as other events that supports their campaign.

Nicole Viena, "Healthier Choices for the Hawaii Locals"
Abstract: Diabetes has slowly become an epidemic issue in the United States. Among the adult population in Hawai’i, about 600,000 residents are living with prediabetes or diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, about one in three individuals are affected in Hawai’i. Clearly, diabetes has proven to be a problem in Hawai’i and nationwide being the seventh leading cause of death. In this presentation, I will describe the current state of diabetes in Hawaii and discuss studies that concentrate on innovative strategies against diabetes and educating the community about the importance of prevention and management control.

Noel Niles, Phuc Tran and Kellen Beauregard, "iBeach: Quantifying coastal erosion using computer vision"
Abstract: We propose to build an inexpensive camera and data collection system that will be used to monitor coastal erosion. The system will consist of cameras which will collect coastal images and send them to a central storage location. In addition to the camera hardware we will create a computer vision software algorithm that will process and analyze the the images collected by the cameras. Finally we will make a user interface in order to visualize the changes in the beach. The data from this project will be used to monitor changes in beach shape and to inform policy makers and engineers in designing sustainable solutions to coastal erosion.

COMMUNITY IMPACT:

Michelle Ann Cala, "Primary Prevention of Sexual Violence at the Hawaii Department of Health: Maternal and Child Health Branch"
Abstract: In this presentation, I will describe and discuss my internship experience at the Hawaii Department of Health’s Maternal and Child Health Branch Sexual Violence Prevention Program, which works to promote health and wellness specifically in the area of sexual violence prevention. The branch uses the public health approach of primary prevention to target populations in Hawaii that are most vulnerable and at risk of victimization. Through a variety of creating local contracts/partnerships with community organizations, developing trainings for the community and organizing events, the Sexual Violence Prevention Program works to reduce the prevalence of sexual violence in Hawaii, thus contributing towards the overall mission of the Department of Health.

David Shaku, "Housing First in Hawaii: The Necessity of Healthy Landlord Relation"
Abstract: In 2016, the Hawaii Statewide Homeless Point-in-Time count revealed an overall increase of homeless individuals by 4 percent, a 12 percent increase in overall unsheltered individuals and families, and a 27 percent increase in chronically homeless individuals and families when compared to 2015. As providers in Hawaii continue to address this serious issue, there is a common thread of frustration among them: landlords unwilling to accept housing subsidies. In the Housing First model, the model currently supported by federal, state, and local government agencies as most effective in remediating houseless populations, the relationship between providers and the local landlord community is a critical element in success. Through research and review, the policies agencies and legislators in other localities that have been proven successful can be applied to Hawaii. The focus of this capstone project is generating policy briefs with accompanying literature for agencies on Oahu, such as Kalihi-Palama Health Center, with suggestions respective to their role in the Housing First Program. As Hawaii providers and government agencies continue to implement the Housing First model of care, these concise reports will hopefully provide easy access to information to improve relations with the landlord community.

Rosalee Lee, Permanent Supportive Housing Programs and Learning Basic Life Skill"
Abstract: The Permanent Supportive Housing Program (PSH) provides safe, stable, housing for chronically homeless with mental illness. Supplying housing to this population stabilizes their environment, to some degree. The successful nature of PHS has resulted in a reduction in hospitalization and emergency room usage, social and health services, and increasing behavioral health treatment. These services have shown to be taxing towards the economic system. Agencies that receive funds from the federal government for PSH programs are required to provide housing, case management services, and mental/behavioral treatment. Kalihi-Palama Health Center (KPHC) housing programs clients challenged with transitioning from being homeless to being housed. Clients' lack the knowledge of basic life skills needed to maintain their housing, therefore, the stigma that everyone has the basic life skills are negatively impacting clients. Clients that are determined to keep their housing sometimes lack the capacity and knowledge to do so, thus this proposal seeks to have additional services/groups implemented to mitigate barriers to maintaining housing. This capstone presentation aims to show that without integrating additional support services, and addressing individuals’ needs, the client will have challenges retaining housing. The challenges are limited resources and finances available to implement the essential group/program.

Aja Murillo, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Insomnia and the Active Duty Service Member"
Abstract: Insomnia is a growing issue in the United States population. This is also reflected in the military, where the day to day stressors are more prevalent than the average US citizen not serving in the Armed Forces. The modality that most fits in addressing this issue in the military for its low cost, and effectiveness would be Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Insomnia (CBT-I). Multiple studies have shown that medication may address the issues in the forefront but is not ideal for long-term use, and does not usually overcome the issue of insomnia. Whereas, CBT-I is designed to give tools to Active Duty Service Members (ADSM) to combat insomnia and ultimately prevent further issues arising in mental health. I designed a proposal for a CBT-I group that will assist Naval Health Clinic Hawaii; Behavioral Health in meeting the needs of heathy sleep for our ADSM. In doing so will ensure our ADSM maintain ‘Mission First’ objectives for the branch they serve by mitigating issues that they can control through changed behaviors through my proposed CBT-I training.

 

Graduate

1ST PLACE:

Angelina Henderson, Diversion Programs: An Alternative to Juvenile Delinquency?"
Abstract: Past research has been limited in the topic of diversion programs and recidivism rates in relation to demographics of youth who are first-time offenders for a misdemeanor offense; results are mixed with studies showing diversion programs as: effective, ineffective, and only effective if certain standards are met. The present study will examine the question: Is there a relationship between demographics (diversion program participant characteristics) and recidivism rates for first-time offending youth who participate in a one-time diversion program? The research site is the Juvenile Justice Center program facilitated by Youth Services Center (City and County of Honolulu) Oahu, Hawaii. This research is quantitative in nature, a descriptive, retrospective study looking at existing archival data (2010-2014) of which has already been collected and de-identified by the Juvenile Justice Center. The data analysis utilized Chi-square (𝑥") test to examine if there is a statistically significant relationship between demographic information (gender, zip code) and recidivism rates in youth. In addition, the data also includes age and percentages of reoffending youth within each zip code; therefore, subsequent data analysis included Pearson’s (𝑟") Correlation test. Studying demographic information is important because it can help identify groups that may need more attention regarding recidivism rates.

2ND PLACE:

Lydie Holmes, "Castle Hospital Readmission from Patient Perspective"
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to examine reasons for hospital readmission according to patient perspectives in an effort to identify those which are avoidable and measures that can be taken to prevent them. Hospital admissions can be very expensive, but fortunately the patient’s insurance carrier covers most. Hospital readmissions however, present a threat of financial penalties to hospitals as of October 2012. A hospital readmission is an admission that occurs within thirty days of the previous admission. Many hospital readmissions are considered preventable and thus an injustice to both the taxpayer and the patient receiving poor quality care. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that after the Affordable Care Act (ACA) created the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) and the Partnership for Patients PFP initiative approximately 565,000 readmissions were prevented between April 2010 and May 2015 (Jencks, Williams & Coleman, 2009). While these programs offer the opportunity to identify and communicate to stakeholders that the problem of readmission exists, they do not offer a solution to correct the problem.

3RD PLACE:

Christiana Chun, "Mindfulness and Anxiety in Children"
Abstract: Anxiety is defined as the preparation for an event that may be seen as an imminent threat (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Similar to adults, anxiety is the most common psychiatric disorder amongst U.S. children (Child Mind Institute, 2015). Research affirms group work as an intervention strategy that yields benefits for children suffering from symptoms of anxiety (Bernstein, Layne, Egan, & Tennison, 2005). Anxiety intervention programs embedded within the school culture may provide a unique opportunity to generalize management skills (Anderson, et al., 2012). One example of a schoolbased program is called The Lunch Bunch Group Program, which is a behavioral intervention program facilitated by social workers within the Hawaii State Department of Education elementary schools. Mindfulness is the practice of focusing all of one’s attention to the current and present moment (McKenzie, 2013). Group activities and exercises applying mindfulness encourage group members to experience the present moment and to understand reactions to what they are experiencing. Mindfulnessbased practice works to improve daily functioning by mitigating stress, improving decision-making capacities, and creating healthier relationships (McKenzie, 2013). With this understanding in mind, the proposed study will observe to better understand if the intervention of mindfulness in the Lunch Bunch group setting has an impact on anxious behaviors among primary-age children.

Gabrielle Lout, "Restoring the Ala Wai: The Ecosystem Services Approach and Green Infrastructure In An Urban Coastal Watershed"
Abstract: The Ala Wai Watershed, an urban and coastal watershed, provides valuable ecosystem services to state of Hawaii. These ecosystem services, or benefits that people receive from the natural environment to increase their well-being, are threatened by extremely poor water quality, storm water runoff, flooding, and increased urban developmen. This study investigated the coastal watershed management practices of the Ala Wai, using the Ecosystem Services Approach (ESA) to frame the investigation. Interviews with various stakeholders illustrated stakeholder participation, as well as what degree stakeholders are aware of and account for ecosystem services in management activities. Several services were stated, with fresh water provisioning, recreation, and tourism as the most valuable to the well-being of the population and economy. Various coastal watershed management strategies were recommending or suggested to enhance and restore the watershed’s ecosystem services, including Green Infrastructure (GI). A Geographic Information Systems assessment was done using land-use impervious surfaces cover and annual rainfall data to estimate the rain water harvesting potential within the watershed region. Using this data, the benefits of Green Infrastructure were demonstrated and indicate that implementing Green Infrastructure can effectively manage storm water, improve water quality, and enhance recreation and tourism services.

EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION:

Andrew Alvarado, "Hospital Based Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Residential Adolescent Patients"
Abstract: The purpose of this capstone project is to research on how to better improve the DBT group at the Family Treatment Center. Historically the DBT group has been isolated to select staffs including a behavioral health associate and social workers that work on the unit. The group may have potential benefit with input from different professions that work with direct care with the patients. In this presentation, I will report on a survey designed to gather information from the staff on how to better improve the DBT group at the Family Treatment Center. The survey was structured to gather demographic information such as job title, years worked at the Family Treatment Center, and previous DBT training in order to make a clear assessment on the participant. Participant were asked attitudinal questions pertaining to the effectiveness of the DBT groups on the unit which varied from Likert to scaled questions. The final portion was open ended questions which asked participants on what changes they would like to see in the DBT groups on the unit.

Alissa Youart, "Secondary Trauma and Employee Assistance Programs"
Abstract: A qualitative method for research was chosen for the exploration of secondary trauma and employee assistance programs to gather information on the prevalence of secondary trauma in crisis workers, how their trauma affects them and their quest for treatment. The aim was to gather information on how each participant has been affected by secondary trauma in the workplace, how they cope with the trauma, if and how they seek help, and what type of help or programs they are using. The research explored the prevalence of secondary trauma in crisis workers but with an emphasis on seeking help and employee assistance programs (EAP). Information was gathered regarding an employee’s access to EPA's, if and how they seek treatment for secondary trauma, and the types of treatment they seek out. The strategy for data collection included engaging the selected participants in an interview which included both open and close ended questions. There were three participants used in the study that varied in age/ethnic background/socioeconomic status. Results show that two out of three participants were familiar with the term secondary trauma but were unaware of what it meant. One out of the three participants was aware of the term secondary trauma and 3 out of 3 participants received zero support from their employer for secondary traumatic symptoms.

COMMUNITY IMPACT:

Adam Fabel, "Cognitive Behavioral Therapy as a treatment modality for children survivors of sexual abuse and trauma"
Abstract: The prevalence of child sexual abuse and trauma has been consistently increasing, resulting in continued prevalence of children subjected to abuse. One out of 5 girls and 1 out of 20 boys are believed to have been sexually abused during their lifetime. Given these statistics, it is imperative to create effective and evidence based treatment methodologies for the symptoms of this abuse. Programs such as The Children’s Alliance of Hawaii provide group and individual therapy, monetary assistance, and parent training, yet there are extremely limited options in the state of Hawaii for treatment of the symptoms of sexual abuse and trauma. Extensive research has indicated that the results of sexual abuse and trauma in children often manifests as symptoms similar to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to be an effective treatment for adults suffering from PTSD, however, the utilization of CBT as a treatment method for children victims of sexual abuse and trauma is limited. This poster will present the viability and feasibility of integrating CBT at The Children’s Alliance of Hawaii.

Lucille Flood, "Exploring Educators’ Perspectives on Decolonizing Social Work Education in Hawaii"
Abstract: In order to better fulfill social work’s mission of diversity and cultural competence, Indigenous and allied social work practitioners and educators are engaging in critical discussions about how social work can be responsive to the needs of local Indigenous communities. In Hawaii, Native Hawaiians are disproportionally represented in nearly all measures of social and health disparities, suggesting the need for improved practices and methods for addressing these disparities. This qualititative study uses in‐depth interviews with social work educators in Hawaii to explore their perspectives about interest, barriers, and access to decolonizing and indigenous perspectives in the social work programs in Hawaii. Results are still being analyzed.

UNDERGRADUATE

1ST PLACE:

Shala Borne, Humanities, "Asian-Pacific Perspective on Death & the Afterlife"

Abstract: The interest in the afterlife and what becomes of oneself and loved ones in death is a realm up to continuous speculation and debate. By examining Asian-pacific beliefs one sees the differing perspectives on death and the afterlife across cultures. The differences are examined through varying philosophical perspectives and religious views.  Complimentary beliefs are observed in cultural and traditional practices across Japan, Korea, Sri Lanka, and Thailand from a Buddhist philosophical perspective. Practices examined include the treatment of the deceased, cemeteries and other locals associated with the dead in Sri Lanka; funerary practices concerning the bodies of the deceased and religious artifacts such as the burial of sutras during the Koryo period in Korea; concerns for ones fate in the afterlife with the concept of rebirth, the realms of Tusita and Amida heaven, as well as hell; and the idea of an honorable death through self-immolation found in cases in both China and Japan.  The method used for this dissertation is through research with eight academic essays, and texts as well as two films. These materials were collected from archives and in physical print. In conclusion it is observed that death and the afterlife in the Asian-pacific region play prominent roles in cultural practices in regards to the dead. As seen through this cultural lens, ones actions in life have merit in the next life and in death one does not merely perish but maintains a lasting impact on the living.

2ND PLACE:

AUSTAN VANCE, SOCIAL WORK, "IF YOU KNEW HOW TO SAVE A LIFE, WOULD YOU? A TRAINING GUIDE FOR OVERDOSE INTERVENTION"
Abstract: Drug overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in Hawaii. With the passing of SB 2392, which allows expanded access for naloxone in the state of Hawaii, there exists a need for a training curriculum that teaches staff and lay persons how to administer naloxone safely in the event of an overdose. This project seeks to develop an effective overdose intervention curriculum relevant to Hawaii residents so that more lives can be saved in the event of accidental overdose due to both prescription and street drug usage. The curriculum has been made comprehensive for staff or service providers, and quick and easy to understand for lay persons. The curriculum has been made relevant to Hawaii residents, regarding local laws and local resources.

3RD PLACE:

NING HSU & SHION PRITCHARD, PSYCHOLOGY, "ELEMENTS OF RACIAL IDENTITY IN A DIVERSE SETTING"
Abstract: Researchers sought to study how individuals perceive and experience their own race. There have been studies that examine how individuals feel about other individuals from different racial groups (Apfelbaum, Norton, & Sommers, 2012; Gaither, Pauker, & Johnson, 2012; Gaither, Sommers, & Ambady, 2013; Richeson & Nussbaum, 2004; Williams & Eberhardt, 2008). However most previous research does not show how individuals experience their own race and how components like culture, language or being a minority/majority affect how individuals conceptualize their own race. This study addresses the lack of research on how people define and experience their racial identity. Participants were asked to complete an online survey measuring previously studied concepts of race along with the cultural elements of food, language and relationships. The current study hypothesized the replicability of the results from previous studies and that non-white monoracials and multiracials would find food and language more important than white monoracials in terms of their racial identity. Results supported hypothesis two that non-white monoracials and multiracials would identify more concrete cultural aspects like food and language as important to their racial identity, while little support was found for the first hypothesis besides white monoracials reported experiencing more privilege.

Graduate

1ST PLACE:

Sarah (Bobby) Cercone, Social Work, "Contingency Management with Substance Abuse Treatment"

Abstract: The purpose of this research was to identify the barriers present at the Hina Mauka Kaneohe Substance Abuse Treatment Center in implementing a Contingency Management program. The research will be used to alter the current program to improve systems and reduce barriers for staff members. The central guiding question was "What are the barriers to staff buy-in for the implementation of the Contingency Management (CM) program at Hina Mauka?" This question was answered with a qualitative design consisted of interviews in a focus group, field notes, and specified demographic information .Results cannot be generalized to a larger population due to the small sample size. However, the results found common themes as barriers: lack of funding, education, consistency, and time. These themes point to multiple possible alterations to the current programing, as well as opportunities for further research within related Hina Mauka sites, and possibly, other Substance Abuse Treatment facilities on Oahu.

2ND PLACE:

Shari Ann Bautista, Social Work, "Bridging the Cultural Divide: Shifting the Caregiver Mentality to a Self-Determination Approach"

Abstract: This statewide qualitative research gathered input on how the Hawaii state Medicaid program, Med-QUEST Division, could develop culturally appropriate training about new federal regulations for providers of home and community-based services (HCBS). The federal intent of these regulations is to ensure that individuals receiving HCBS have full access to benefits of community living and the opportunity to receive services in the most integrated setting appropriate. In Med-QUEST Division’s 5-year transition plan, “My Choice, My Way,” training for HCBS providers is scheduled for August 2016. Given that approximately 90 percent of HCBS providers in Hawaii are Filipino, the goal of this research is to understand Filipino cultural values, strengths, and barriers related to caregiving and the new regulations. The research was conducted via key informant interviews across the state on the islands of Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai, Maui, and Big Island. The interviews led to recommendations for Med-QUEST to conduct the training for HCBS providers. Two main questions are at the root of this research: (1) How should this information about the new regulations be communicated to HCBS providers? (2) What strategies should Med-QUEST use in training HCBS providers on this self-determination approach to caregiving?

3RD PLACE:

Michael Paeste, Social Work, "Recognizing Burnout & Cultural Influences Among Multigenerational Family Caregivers"

Abstract: Background: Multigenerational family caregivers have dual roles in taking care for their immediate family and for an aging loved one. Explore caregiver’s unique experiences may provide an insight as to why they decided to become a caregiver and how culture influences their views on burnout. Methodology:Participants were comprised of multigenerational family caregivers who primarily resided on Oahu, Hawaii. A 60-minute interview was conducted. The participants were asked to read a case study scenario, which illustrated many burnout symptoms. Participants were a series of follow up questions that include a connection to the case study scenario, their decision in becoming a multigenerational family caregiver, and their understanding of burnout through the context of their own culture. Findings: Collectivistic cultures do not recognize the occurrence of burnout. Participants reported that the accompanied challenges and struggle in being a caregiver is anticipated. When asked for a specific word, in their culture, that recognizes burnout all participants reported no known word. This study identified three themes: (1) putting their individual lives on hold; (2) self-esteem/self-acceptance; and (3) role acceptance.

UNDERGRADUATE ORAL PRESENTATIONS

1ST PLACE:

Brendan Ito, Psychology,Characterization of Mutations in the GluN2A Subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate Receptor (NMDAR) - Implications for Epilepsy

2ND PLACE:

Lindy Higa, John Garo, Nate Marder, & Jose Reque, Computer Science,A Mobile Platform Utilizing Cloud Integration to Support Small Businesses in Hawaii

3RD PLACE:

Minerva Leos,TESOL,Using Students' Native Language in the Acquisition of English

UNDERGRADUATE POSTER PRESENTATIONS

1ST PLACE:

Katie Hillstead, Elementary Education/TESOL Certificate,Differentiating Standards-based Curriculum for English Language Learners:  A Teacher Work Sample

2ND PLACE:

Devin Blas & Nicolas Guzman, Psychology,Assessing Racial Preferences in Movies: The Impact of Media on Stereotypical Thinking

3RD PLACE:

GIAVANTE' DOUGLAS, Social Work, Strategies to maintain self-sufficiency

Graduate Oral Presentations

1ST PLACE:

Mark Brians II, MA Communications,Dostoevsky and the Poetics of Forgiveness Communication

2ND PLACE:

Sara Fowler, MA TESOL,Catalan in the Classroom:  A Language Under Fire

3RD PLACE:

Martin Molden,MA TESOL,Norwegian learners of English - Phonological Problems and Solutions

Graduate Poster Presentations

1ST PLACE:

Kirk Elliot Jarett, MS Social Work,Caregiver Burden and the Maltreatment of Care-Recipients with Developmental and Cognitive Disabilities

2ND PLACE:

Colleen Zaremba, MS Social Work,Implications of Climate Change for Small Island Developing States:  A Systematic Review of the Literature

3RD PLACE:

Kenneth Chavis, Anh Nguyen, Kudakwashe Chinyanya, Caitlin Karieta, Remina Kakuta, Christer Nyrud, Victoria Sanches & Faustino Dy,MBA Economics,A Strategic Audit of Go Pro Inc.

UNDERGRADUATE ORAL PRESENTATIONS

1ST PLACE:

Danae DeRaad & Aaron Thomas, Biochemistry/Chemistry,Mutations in the GABA Receptor involved in Epilepsy

2ND PLACE:

Cole Parks & Matt Troglia, Applied Math,Are you safe in your apartment building? Modeling the effect of earthquakes on tall buildings

3RD PLACE:

Kevin Goo, Brent Nagareda, & Revelyn Cabaya, Computer Science/Computer Information Systems,‘Olelo Online Form Redesign

UNDERGRADUATE POSTER PRESENTATIONS

1ST PLACE:

Michelle Chung, Mia Davis, Barton Felipe, Andrew Lum, Bronson Maulupe Kanae, Amy McAllister, Chassidy Sakamoto, & Meera Venkatesh,International Business, Travel and Hospitality Management, Computer Information Systems,Ikaros Consulting’s Strategic Audit of Hawaiian Airlines

2ND PLACE:

Brandon Funai, TESOL,Determining appropriate teaching materials for English - learning students

3RD PLACE:

Matt Archick, Jabari Brooks, & Estefania Duterte, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science,Ulu Hoku: Project Management & Android Development

Graduate Oral Presentations

1ST PLACE:

Chrysa Staiano, TESOL,A Showcase and Evaluation of my Content-based Teaching Unit: Opportunities in the US Armed Forces

2ND PLACE:

Trevor Tresselle,Diplomacy & Military Studies,Eisenhower’s Psychological War: The Use of Music to Buttress Americanism

3RD PLACE:

Damion Mullins,Financial Economics & Information Systems,Book Catalog and Inventory System

Graduate Poster Presentations

1ST PLACE:

Enoy Vongsay, Jon Watanabe, Chun-Ju Lee, & Wan-Chi Chang, Information Systems,State of Hawaii, Transformation Internship Program (TIP) Bureau of Conveyance Automated Attendant

2ND PLACE:

Daniel Gallegos, Janice Jensen, Mubarak Albishi, Shadi Al-Thakafi, & Abo Fahad,Information Systems,Total Modernization of Information Technology Infrastructure – Department of Human Resources Development (Information Systems Office)

Undergraduate Oral Presentations

1ST PLACE:

Lady Renee Consolacion and Kaudyna Polewacz, Biochemistry: “Site-directed Mutagensesis of GABAA  Receptor”

2ND PLACE:

Patricia Tate, Marine Biology: “Hawaiian Monk Seal Survivorship”
Nicholas Becher, English: “The Collective Evolution of Culture: A Mediation of Universalism and   Relativism through Wole Soyinka’s Death and the King’s Horseman”

3RD PLACE:

Abraham Pineda, Joshua Cayco and Mark Evangelista, Computer Science: “SushiOnWheels: Catering Website Revamp”

Undergraduate Poster Presentations

1ST PLACE:

Shoihei Sasahara, Precious Binas and Nathaniel Befus, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science: “Redesign of the HPU Tutoring Management System”

2ND PLACE:

Andrew Worthen and William Gray, Multimedia Cinematic Production: “808 Mafia”

3RD PLACE:

Lauren Victoria, Integrated Multimedia: “Corporate Branding and Design Project for Nilma Hunter Creations