Core Curriculum Areas

Following or in tandem with the First Year Common Core, students will be required to take one course in each of the remaining eight curriculum areas:

Courses explore multiple histories, social movements, cultural heritages, and belief systems that shape the United States – its norms, laws, public policies and discourses – in the context of the country’s rich and varied cultural diversity. Students will develop oral communication skills, consider ethical and social decisions from multiple perspectives, explore individual and group beliefs, and critically examine factors supporting and sustaining inequitable treatment of groups of people in the U.S.

Students successfully completing these courses will obtain the following skills, knowledge, perspectives, and values:

 

SKILLS (MĀKAU NAʻAUAO):

  • oral COMMUNICATION – Students speak clearly and effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes.

 

KNOWLEDGE & PERSPECTIVES (`IKE):

  • HISTORICAL AND CONCEPTUAL PERSPECTIVES – Students investigate and apply concepts from history or the humanities to describe and analyze phenomena over time.  

  • SOCIETIES AND CULTURES – Students explore cross-cultural perspectives that both distinguish and connect regions, countries, languages, and cultures.

 

VALUES (MEA WAIWAI):

  • ETHICAL REASONING AND VALUES – Students identify, explain, and evaluate the ethical perspectives of others and themselves.

 

COURSES (1 course – 3 semester credits or 4 quarter credits for transfer students)

  • AMST 2000 – Topics in American Studies
  • HIST 1401 – American Stories: Themes in American History to 1877
  • HIST 1402 – The American Experience: 1865 to Present
  • HUM 1270 – Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies
  • PADM 1000 - Introduction to Leadership in America (effective Fall 2017)
  • PHIL 2500 - Ethics in America (effective Fall 2017)
  • PSCI 1400 – The American Political System 
  • SOC 1000 - Introduction to Sociology (effective Fall 2017)

The creative arts celebrate the human capacity to imagine, create, and transform ideas into expressive forms, such as paintings, poems, music, theater, digital design, and photography. Courses introduce students to ways of experiencing and understanding a variety of artistic concepts, structures, and forms. Students will engage in imaginative and intuitive practices to develop their ability to understand creative works and express ideas through the arts.

Students successfully completing these courses will obtain the following skills, knowledge and perspectives: 

 

SKILLS (MĀKAU NAʻAUAO):

  • AESTHETIC APPRECIATION AND EXPRESSION – Students will engage in creative practices to interpret and express ideas through various art forms.

 

KNOWLEDGE AND PERSPECTIVES (`IKE):

  • SOCIETIES & CULTURES – Students explore cross-cultural perspectives that both distinguish and connect regions, countries, languages, and cultures.

 

COURSES (1 course – 3 semester credits or 4 quarter credits for transfer students)

  • ARTH 2301 – World Art History
  • ARTS 1000 – Introduction to Visual Arts
  • ARTS 2150 – Introduction to Design
  • ENG 2000 – The Art of Literature
  • MUS 1000 – Introduction to Classical Music
  • MUS 2101 – Music in World Cultures
  • THEA 2320 – Acting I: Basic Acting for Stage and Screen
  • WRI 2601 – Introduction to Creative Writing

Critical thinking intersects with oral, written, and visual communication skills as fundamental proficiencies required for academic, professional, and personal success. Courses prepare students to think critically about questions of fact, value, or concept. Students will learn the techniques, strategies, and methods of critical thinking; practice oral and visual communication skills, and demonstrate the ability to express ideas and arguments clearly and coherently. It is highly recommended that students fulfill this Curriculum area requirement early in their degree plan.

Students successfully completing these courses will obtain the following skills:

 

SKILLS (MĀKAU NAʻAUAO):

  • CRITICAL THINKING – .Students synthesize information, explain issues, analyze concepts and evidence, assess assumptions, define their own perspectives and positions, and evaluate the implications and consequences of their conclusions.
  •  ORAL COMMUNICATION  – Students speak clearly and effectively for a variety of audiences and purposes.

 

COURSES (1 course – 3 semester credits or 4 quarter credits for transfer students)

  • COM 1000 – Introduction to Communication Skills
  • COM 2000 – Public Speaking
  • ECON 2010 – Principles of Microeconomics
  • ENG 2100 - Reading Film, Literature, and Culture 
  • GEOG 2000 – Visualizing Human Geography
  • HIST 1717 – Reacting to the Past
  • PH 1300 – Public Health Ethics (effective Fall 2018)
  • PSY 1000  Introduction to Psychology

Courses explore cross-cultural perspectives and selected concepts that underscore contemporary issues of global concern. Students will develop awareness of cultural practices and traditions in the context of a changing, globalizing world while reflecting on their own values and customs. Students will learn exchange ideas and connect with diverse communities and cultures.

Students successfully completing these courses will obtain the following skills, knowledge, and perspectives:

 

SKILLS (MĀKAU NAʻAUAO):

  • TEAMWORK – Students work effectively in teams.

 

KNOWLEDGE & PERSPECTIVES (`IKE):

  • HISTORICAL & CONCEPTUAL PERSPECTIVES – Students investigate and apply concepts from history or the humanities to describe and analyze phenomena over time. 
  • SOCIETIES & CULTURES – Students explore cross-cultural perspectives that both distinguish and connect regions, countries, languages, and cultures.

 

COURSES (1 course – 3 semester credits or 4 quarter credits for transfer students)

  • AL 2000 - Introduction to Linguistics (effective Fall 2017)
  • ANTH 2000 – Cultural Anthropology
  • GEOG 1500 – World Regional Geography
  • HIST 1002 – Global Crossroads: 1500 - Present
  • INTR 1000 – The International System
  • MULT 2000 – Global Cinema Studies
  • PH 2060 - Comparative Health Systems (effective Fall 2017)
  • REL 1000 – Introduction to World Religions

Courses focus on the nature of discovery, scientific reasoning, and invention to develop critical awareness of the methods and limits of scientific inquiry. Students will cultivate observational and analytical skills, particularly in reference to the natural world.

Students successfully completing these courses will obtain the following skills, knowledge, and perspectives:

 

SKILLS (MĀKAU NAʻAUAO):

  • QUANTITATIVE REASONING – Students use quantitative reasoning to analyze problems and identify solutions.


KNOWLEDGE & PERSPECTIVES (`IKE): 

  • NATURAL SCIENCES – Students apply concepts from the natural sciences to describe, analyze, or explain natural phenomena.

 

COURSES (1 course – 3 semester credits or 4 quarter credits for transfer students)

  • BIOL 1000 - Introductory Biology
  • BIOL 1300 - Nutrition: Eat Smarter (effective Fall 2018)
  • CHEM 1000 - Introductory Chemistry
  • CHEM 2050 - General Chemistry
  • GEOG 1000 - Introduction to Physical Geography
  • GEOL 1000 - The Dynamic Earth
  • MARS 1000 - Introductory Oceanography
  • PHYS 1020 - Astronomy

Courses will help students understand the changing world they live in and become active contributors as society seeks to achieve sustainability. Students will examine, through multidisciplinary perspectives, the inherent connection between natural, social, and economic systems and engage in applied and experiential learning opportunities. Students will engage in community activities that encourage them to think of a future they wish to create, rather than react to present problems by reductive problem solving.

Students successfully completing these courses will obtain the following skills, knowledge, perspectives and values:

 

SKILLS (MĀKAU NAʻAUAO):

  • TEAMWORK – Students work effectively in teams.

 

KNOWLEDGE & PERSPECTIVES (`IKE):

  • NATURAL SCIENCES – Students apply concepts from the natural sciences to describe, analyze, or explain natural phenomena.

  • SUSTAINABILITY – Students identify how ecological, social, and economic systems work together to promote sustainable futures.

 

VALUES (MEA WAIWAI):

  • CIVIC ENGAGEMENT – Students identify and engage in efforts that constructively influence the public good.

 

COURSES (1 course – 3 semester credits or 4 quarter credits for transfer students)

  • AQUA 1200 - Global Aquaculture for Food Security and Conservation (Effective Fall 2017)
  • ARTS 1003 - Sustainable Art and Design
  • BIOL 1500 - Conservation Biology
  • ENVS 1000 - Introduction to Environmental Science (Effective Fall 2017)
  • ENVS 1030 - Tropical Ecology and Sustainability (Effective Fall 2017)
  • MARS 1500 - Marine Biology and the Global Ocean (Effective Fall 2017)
  • SWRK 2010 - Social Sustainability, Social Work, and Social Entrepreneurship

Courses explore technology systems and processes in order to develop an understanding of the impact of technology on individuals, the environment, and the global community. Students will apply modern technology for acquiring, analyzing and sharing information; and through this they will learn both physical and social aspects of technology, explore innovative practices and be challenged to draw upon their imagination and knowledge to propose novel solutions to problems.

Students successfully completing these courses will obtain the following skills:

 

SKILLS (MĀKAU NAʻAUAO):

  • technology and innovation  – Students apply an understanding of technology to solve problems; explore innovative practices for acquiring, analyzing and sharing information; and understand the impact of technology on society.

  • CRITICAL THINKING – Students synthesize information, explain issues, analyze concepts and evidence, assess assumptions, define their own perspectives and positions, and evaluate the implications and consequences of their conclusions.

 COURSES (1 course – 3 semester credits or 4 quarter credits for transfer students)

  • CSCI 1041 - Digital Literacy in a Global Society
  • CSCI 1061 - Mobile Technologies for the 21st Century
  • CSCI 1611 - A Gentle Introduction to Computer Programming
  • ENGE 1000 - Introduction to Engineering Systems and Professional Practice (effective Fall 2018)
  • HIST 2630 - The History of Science and Technology
  • MATH 1234 - Introduction to Cryptology
  • MIS 2000 - Information Tools for Business
  • MULT 1100 - Foundations of Multimedia Production

Courses will help students explore the historical development of human societies and important movements and themes which have shaped and continue to influence the world. Students will assess information, ask questions, debate ideas and explain the significance of political, social, scientific, and cultural trends in a historical context.

Students successfully completing these courses will obtain the following knowledge, perspectives, and values:

 

KNOWLEDGE & PERSPECTIVES (`IKE):

  • HISTORICAL AND CONCEPTUAL PERSPECTIVES – Students investigate and apply concepts from history or the humanities to describe and analyze phenomena over time. 

  • SOCIETIES AND CULTURES – Students explore cross-cultural perspectives that both distinguish and connect regions, countries, languages, and cultures.

 

VALUES (MEA WAIWAI):

  • ETHICAL REASONING AND VALUES – Students identify, explain, and evaluate the ethical perspectives of others and themselves.

 

COURSES (1 course – 3 semester credits or 4 quarter credits for transfer students)

  • AL 1100 – Language, Power, and Identity
  • CLST 1000 – Great Books, East and West
  • ECON 2015 – Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ENG 2500 – World Literature                 
  • HIST 1001 – Traditions and Encounters: World Cultures to 1500
  • PH 1200 - Introduction to Public Health Professions (effective Fall 2017)
  • PSCI 2000 – Introduction to Politics
  • SOC 2600 – Peace Studies