Laurie Leach PH.D.

College of Liberal Arts - Department of English and Applied Linguistics

LAURIE LEACH PH.D.

College of Liberal Arts - Department of English and Applied Linguistics

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH

EDUCATION:
Ph.D., English, Louisiana State University,  1990
M.A.,  English, Louisiana State University, 1987
B.A.,  English,  University of Virginia,  1986

COURSES FREQUENTLY TAUGHT:

WRI       1150      Literature and Argument

WRI       1200      Research, Argument and Writing

AMST     2000    Topics in American Studies

ENG       3102      Nineteenth-Century British Literature

ENG       3122      Nineteenth-Century American Literature

ENG       3202     Literature of Slavery

ENG       3224     Ethnic Literature

ENG       4120     Seminar in Modernism

HUM      3900     Research and Writing in the Humanities

 

RECENT Conference Presentations:

“Portraying Nat Turner: Parker versus Styron.”  Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association 2017, Honolulu, HI, Oct. 10-12, 2017

“‘Good Slaveholders’ and Questionable Allies: The Moral Ambiguity of the White Characters in Roots.” Roots at 40: Reflections and Remembrances.  Goodwin College, East Hartford, CT, October 6, 2017.

“Unsettling Questions: Teaching Kindred in a Course on the Literature of Slavery.”  Octavia E. Butler Conference 2016: Celebrating Letters, Life and Legacy. Octavia E. Butler Society, Atlanta, GA Feb. 26-28, 2016.

 “The Power of the Spoken Word: Oratory and Social Action.”  Community College Humanities Association, Pacific Western Division Conference, Seattle, WA, October 16-18, 2014.

“Heroes and Villains in John Patrick Shanley’s Doubt.” 14th Global Conference on Evil and Human Wickedness. Inter-disciplinary.net. Lisbon, Portugal, March 10-12, 2013

 

PUBLICATIONS:

BOOK
Langston Hughes: A Biography. Greenwood Press, 2004.

ESSAYS IN COLLECTIONS

"Heroes and Villains in John Patrick Shanley's Doubt." Concerning Evil. Edited by Grace Halden and Gabriela Madlo. London: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2013. Web. ISBN 978-1-84888-232-4.

“A Fuller Statement of the Case:  Valerie Martin’s Mary Reilly and Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.”  Beyond Adaptation: Essays on Radical Transformations of Original Works. Edited by Phyllis Frus and Christy Williams.  MacFarland,  2010.

 “Margie Polite, The Riot Starter: Harlem, 1943.”  Part of a collection, Leaping into the Fire: Representations of Women in United States Race Riots, edited by Julie Cary Nerad. Studies in the Literary Imagination (40.2) 2007: 25-48.

“A Nice Girl Ought to Know!”: Henry James’s Daisy Miller.” Women in Literature: Reading through the Lens of Gender. Edited by Jerilyn Fisher and Ellen S. Silber, Greenwood Press, 2003. 85-87.

“The Bell Jar: Trapped by the Feminine Mystique.” Women in Literature: Reading through the Lens of Gender. Edited by Jerilyn Fisher and Ellen S. Silber, Greenwood Press, 2003. 35-37.

 “Conflict over Privacy in Indo-American Short Fiction.” Ethnicity and the American Short Story. Edited by Julie Brown. Garland Press, 1997. 197-211.

ARTICLES IN JOURNALS

“Lying, Writing and Confrontation: Mary McCarthy and Lillian Hellman.” LIT: Literature, Interpretation, Theory 15 (2004): 1-24.

"A Comment on `Teachers and Philosophers.'" College English (February 1995): 84-85.

“Explorations of a ‘Sorry Genre’: Andrew Field's Biographies of Vladimir Nabokov.” Biography 15 (1992): 178-91.

“‘The Difficult Business of Intimacy’: Friendship and Writing in Virginia Woolf's The Waves.” South Central Review 7.2 (1990): 53-66.

"Lorenzo and the Noblest Roman: The Noble Assassins of Lorenzaccio and Julius Caesar." Romance Notes 28 (1988): 241-46.

FAVORITE LITERARY QUOTATIONS:

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book!

Jane Austen

Nobody, I think, ought to read poetry, or look at pictures or statues, who cannot find a great deal more in them than the poet or artist has actually expressed.

Nathaniel Hawthorne

 

 

Laurie Leach

Professor
PH.D.

  Send email
  (808) 544-1103
  Downtown Campus, MP 201G