HPU 500 Fall 2020 Course Schedule

FaLL 2020 HPU 500 courses

Term

Course

Title

Credits

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

MATH2214

Calculus I

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

MATH2214

Calculus I

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

MATH2215

Calculus II

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

MATH2215

Calculus II

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

HMLD2900

Careers in Homeland Security

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

PHYS2030/PHYS2031

College Physics I w/Lab

4

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

CSCI1041

Digital Literacy in a Global Society

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

BIOL2050/BIOL2051

General Biology I w/Lab

5

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

CHEM2050/CHEM 2051

General Chemistry I w/Lab

4

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

CSCI1611

Gentle Introduction to Programming

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

HIST1002

Global Crossroads 1500 to Present

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

HIST1002

Global Crossroads 1500 to Present

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

CSCI2761

HTML, CSS and Web Design

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

PH2020

Human Diseases & Conditions

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

HRD2000

Integrated Talent Management

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

CJ1500

Introduction to Cybersecurity

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

HMLD1000

Introduction to Homeland Security

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

HRD1000

Introduction to Human Resource Development

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

GEOG1000

Introduction to Physical Geography

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

PSCI2000

Introduction to Politics

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

PSCI2000

Introduction to Politics

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

PSY1000

Introduction to Psychology

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

PSY1000

Introduction to Psychology

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

PSY1000

Introduction to Psychology

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

ARTS1000

Introduction to Visual Arts

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

MUS1000

Introduction to Western Classical Music

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

CHEM1000

Introductory Chemistry

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

MARS1000

Introductory Oceanography

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

HIST1558

Living History of Hawai'i

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

BIOL1300

Nutrition: Eat Smarter

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

MATH1130

Pre-Calculus I

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

MATH1130

Pre-Calculus I

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

MATH1140

Pre-Calculus II

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

PHIL2090

Principles of Logic

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

ENG1101

Representations of Pacific Life

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

SOC2000

Social Problems and Policy

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

MATH1123

Statistics

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

MATH1123

Statistics

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

ARTS1003

Sustainable Art & Design

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

HIST1402

The American Experience: 1865 to Present

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

HIST1402

The American Experience: 1865 to Present

3

16-Week (08/24-12/13)

ENG2000

The Art of Literature

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

INTR1000

The International System

3

Fall 8B (10/19-12/13)

ENVS1000

The Sustainability Challenge

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

HIST1001

Traditions and Encounters: World Cultures to 1500

3

Fall 8A (08/24-10/18)

CJ1000

Violence in American Society

3

Fall 2020 HPU 500 Course Descriptions

CLICK HERE TO VIEW FALL 2020 HPU 500 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AS A PDF

 

ARTS1000     Introduction to Visual Arts

An introductory visual arts course covering elements of art, principles of design, and the creative process. Major historical movements in art are covered as well as student expressions in various visual media and forms. Lectures and studio demonstrations.

 

ARTS1003     Sustainable Art & Design

An introductory visual arts course that covers sustainability as it relates to art and design. Artists and designers who consciously implement sustainability practices will be explored, with an attention to historical context and larger cultural meaning. Students also complete basic studio art projects and group projects that relate to sustainability. Lectures and studio demonstrations.

 

BIOL1300     Nutrition: Eat Smarter

This course is an introduction to nutrition and its relationship to health. Micronutrients are categorized by their function in the body (tissue guardians, antioxidants, energy generators, essential electrolytes, mineral power plants, blood fortifiers, bone builders). To personalize these concepts, students conduct an assessment of their own eating habits. Students evaluate sources of nutrition information, conflicting opinions and motives, and develop their own value system as a foundation for studying ethical and moral issues concerning food and nutrition.

 

BIOL2050/BIOL2051         General Biology I w/Lab

The first semester of a rigorous introduction to modern biology for students intending to major in the natural sciences. The course includes topics related to biological structure and function, from the molecular level in cells to the integrated workings of organisms. Darwinian evolution is emphasized as a unifying theme in biology.

 

CHEM1000   Introductory Chemistry

An introductory survey of chemistry designed to equip students with information that will enable them to make rational, informed decisions about chemically relevant issues. Includes fundamental chemical principles as well as applications of chemical knowledge and the interactions between chemistry and society.

 

CHEM2050/CHEM 2051  General Chemistry I w/Lab

The first semester of a rigorous introduction to chemistry for students intending to major in the natural sciences. Includes topics related to the atomic-molecular basis of matter, the relationship of chemical reactions to the periodic table, states of matter, solution chemistry, acids and bases, and stoichiometry.

 

CJ1000          Violence in American Society

This course looks at the patterns and correlates interpersonal and collective violence using the most contemporary research, theories, and cases. Today violence remains one of the most pressing issues facing not only American society but countries throughout the world. The course looks at a variety of

different yet connected forms of violence, which include homicide, assault, rape, domestic violence, robberies, genocide, riots, lynching, and terrorism, among others. While engaging in individual and cooperative projects, students will consider the theoretical causes and explanations of the deviant behavior of infamous criminals that have plagued our American society.

 

CJ1500          Introduction to Cybersecurity

This course explores developments and changes in the practice of criminal justice brought about by technology and crime as well as the rapid technological change in computers and other internet access devices. Specific topics include: cybercrime, overview of the concepts and investigative requirements when dealing with cybersecurity, globalization of cybersecurity investigations, how different cybercrimes are committed, the rapid evolution of technology and its effects on crime, cybercrimes against persons, and criminal justice agencies involved in the investigation and prevention of cybercrimes.

 

CSCI1041      Digital Literacy in a Global Society

This course gives students tools to be active participants in today’s global culture of digital literacy. Students will learn current technology for acquiring, analyzing, and sharing information; analytical skills to understand, organize, and analyze numeric and graphic data; and communication skills to convey information in a context appropriate to the receiving audience. Readings will initiate discussions of technology issues such as: cybersecurity, addiction to social media, ethics and privacy, and intellectual property issues in a global society. The course is presented in a global context with local details drawn from a variety of countries and cultures.

 

CSCI1611      Gentle Introduction to Programming

This course is a gentle introduction to creating computer programs using a popular and powerful programming language such as Python or Ruby. Programs tell computers, step by step, how to do the amazing things they do, such as special effects for movies, apps for smart phones, searches through websites, and control of robots. Programs can stimulate and help evaluate models of our world. Students learn problem-solving and critical thinking, crucial skills in college, careers, and life. Topics cover fundamental programming concepts including: variables and data types, conditional and iterative control structures, modularization with functions and parameters, and testing.

 

CSCI2761      HTML, CSS and Web Design

An introduction to web page and web site design. Students will learn the mechanics and aesthetics of a good web design and the best current practices within the evolving HTML and CSS standards. Additional topics include incorporating social media, search engine optimization (SEO), structuring an ecommerce friendly web presence, and using current blogging platforms such as Wordpress or Drupal.

 

ENG1101      Representations of Pacific Life

This course introduces students to selected texts from some of the many cultures of Oceania and to the critical skills they will need to get the most out of these cultural productions. It focuses on an overview of Oceanic literature, emphasizing prose fiction, poetry, drama, and other genres such as journalism, film, and media.

 

ENG2000      The Art of Literature

This course will introduce students to multiple ways of interpreting literature, selected from a variety of literary genres such as poetry, drama, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Texts to be explored will be drawn from multiple cultures and time periods. In addition to studying and applying interpretative strategies, students will have opportunities to apply literary techniques by writing a creative piece in at least one of the genres studied.

 

ENVS1000    The Sustainability Challenge

What is sustainability and what challenges are we facing now and in the future? What is my impact and what can I do about it? In the course, students will learn about the “three-legged stool” (economic, environmental, and social) of sustainability and how to use systems thinking to better understand the complex natural and human systems we rely upon for food, water, energy, business, etc. Students will “take the sustainability challenge” and measure their own current impacts and compare them to their impacts after taking actions to be more sustainable. The collective results will then be used to propose action plans to inspire others on campus and in the broader community to do the same.

 

GEOG1000   Introduction to Physical Geography

A non-laboratory introduction and survey of Earth’s natural environment, including earth-sun relationships, weather and climate, landforms, soils, and vegetation. The effects of these physical elements on human activity are also stressed. The course presents both global and regional perspectives.

 

HIST1001      Traditions and Encounters: World Cultures to 1500

This course is an interpretative survey of the development of cultures from prehistoric times to A.D. 1500. Students will analyze the characteristics of human societies, explore how human cultures have interacted with each other over time, and investigate the evolution of global exchange and the ideas, concepts, and phenomena that have connected and divided people across regional boundaries and time.

 

HIST1002      Global Crossroads 1500 to Present

This course engages students in the study of modern world history in order to achieve a more critical and integrated understanding of global societies and cultures during the past five hundred years. Students will explore developments in Africa, Asia, the Americas, and Europe; consider the interaction of the West and non-West and the eventual domination of the West after 1750; investigate the origins and outcomes of world war, revolution, and genocide in the 20th century; trace the disintegration of western empires after World War II; and ponder the global challenges of the post-Cold War era.

 

HIST1402      The American Experience: 1865 to Present

This course is an introduction to United States history from the end of the Civil War to the present. This course will explore major themes in American history, emphasizing the people, events, and antecedents that have most influenced our world today. As part of the American Experience, we will examine topics such as the everyday lives of ordinary Americans; the rise of great cities and corporations; America’s response to depression and war; the problems of a post-industrial and post-Cold War age; and the impact of modern conditions of America’s traditions, values, and institutions.

 

HIST1558      Living History of Hawai'i

This cross-disciplinary course focuses on aspects of the history of the Hawaiian Islands from the arrival of Captain Cook in 1778. It includes interdisciplinary perspectives from history, museum studies, and preservation studies. In addition, the course includes experiential learning in the form of, for example, historic site visits and/or service learning. Instructors may focus on different time periods such as the monarchy era, the territorial period, and from statehood to the present. Instructors may also take different approaches including perspectives from political, social, cultural, military, or diplomatic history.

 

HMLD1000  Introduction to Homeland Security

This course focuses on a comprehensive overview of homeland security and identifies the important components of homeland security. Students review the roles and responsibilities of government agencies, non-governmental organizations, and individual citizens in homeland security. The student will explore the historical events that have impacted homeland security as well as the threats to homeland security, including natural and technological disasters and intentional threats of domestic and international terrorism. Other key issues addressed are civil liberties and diversity, relationship to public safety, and private security.

 

HMLD2900  Careers in Homeland Security

This course will give students an overview of the different job tasks used primarily in the field of homeland security. It will focus on the structure and development of various careers within the field of homeland security. It also is designed to assist students in understanding the employment options available to them as well as the development of programs and policies within the workplace.

 

HRD1000      Introduction to Human Resource Development

An introduction to major components of human resource development (HRD). This course investigates the roles of HRD practitioners and develops an understanding of HRD theories, principles, and practices.

 

HRD2000      Integrated Talent Management

This course will explore the key elements of effective talent management. Topics include best practices in talent acquisition, performance management, learning and development, and succession management.

 

INTR1000     The International System

This course introduces students to some of the most important and recent thinking on the new international system. How should we think about this new world that is marked by the integration of globalization and the division of terrorism and genocide? Students will be introduced to several of the major works by well-known thinkers on both previous international systems and new views of what the

present and future international system will be. Possible topics explored can include global ideological conflict, the spread of liberalism, the clash of civilizations, imperial systems, the rise of Asia and the decline of the West, etc.

 

MARS1000   Introductory Oceanography

An elementary survey of the geology, chemistry, physics, and biology of the oceans. Topics include: ocean basin morphology, plate tectonics, sedimentation, major and minor components of seawater, ocean circulation, waves, tides, plankton, nekton, and benthic organisms.

 

MATH1123  Statistics

This course provides an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include describing,

summarizing, and displaying data; using sample statistics to estimate population parameters; evaluating hypothesis using confidence levels with application to the physical and social sciences; logically drawing conclusions based on statistical procedures; and quantifying the possibility of error and bias.

 

MATH1130  Pre-Calculus I

This course covers mathematical topics that prepare students for higher-level mathematics courses. Topics include: functions and their properties, polynomial and rational functions and their graphs, transformation method of graphing functions, exponential and logarithmic functions and equations, right-triangle trigonometry, an introduction to trigonometric functions and their graphs, solving systems of inequalities, and solving systems of equations. Optional topics: matrices, determinants and Cramer’s rule, linear programming, fundamental counting principle, permutations and combinations, and an introduction to probability

 

MATH1140  Pre-Calculus II

This course is a continuation of MATH 1130 and covers further mathematical topics that prepare students for higher level mathematics courses. Course topics include: a complete development of trigonometry including trigonometric functions and their identities; solving trigonometric equations, applications of trigonometry to vectors; polar coordinates, and polar form of complex numbers; rectangular form and polar form of conic sections; matrices and matrix formulation of solution of systems of equations; determinants and Cramer’s rule; introduction to sequences and series; and the

binomial theorem.

 

MATH2214  Calculus I

A course in single variable calculus which emphasizes limit, continuity, derivative, and integral. Primary focus is on the derivative with an introduction to the integral and elementary applications of the integral. Differentiation topics include: chain rule, implicit differentiation, curve sketching, and maxima and minima problems. Integration topics include: fundamental theorem of calculus, method of substitution, area between curves, and volumes of revolution.

 

MATH2215  Calculus II

A continuation of Calculus I, completing the development of the integral. Integration topics include: integration by parts, trigonometric substitution, method of partial fractions, length of curves, surfaces, and volumes of revolutions. Other topics include: infinite series, tests of convergence; power series, radius of convergence, and Taylor’s series. Other topics may include calculus of conic sections, vector algebra, and scalar and vector product.

 

MUS1000     Introduction to Western Classical Music

An introductory exploration of the evolution of Western classical music (WCM) from the Middle Ages to the present in relation to the background of life and art. Major historical movements in WCM are covered as well as the basics of reading western music notation. In addition, the impact and influence of non-western music on WCM will be examined.

 

PH2020         Human Diseases & Conditions

An overview of normal human anatomy and physiology by body system; the impacts of internal or external factors that can lead to disease, injury, or disability; and the role of public health interventions to prevent and mitigate negative health outcomes.

 

 

 

PHIL2090      Principles of Logic

The study of the elements of logic. The course promotes critical thinking and sound decision-making by clarifying the nature and importance of logical consequences and by providing intensive practice in recognizing examples of logical consequences. The development of logic as a discipline and its affinities with quantitative reasoning are stressed.

 

PHYS2030/PHYS2031       College Physics I w/Lab

The first semester of an algebra-based study of mechanics, thermodynamics, and wave phenomena with an emphasis on problem solving.

 

PSCI2000      Introduction to Politics

This course is designed to help the student better understand the political world. It surveys the central analytical concepts of political science that help explain the realities of the political world in the early 21st century. The level of analysis ranges from the individual’s political beliefs and actions to the political orientations of groups and states, as well as the dynamics of the international political system.

 

PSY1000       Introduction to Psychology

An introductory course in psychology, covering the major processes underlying human behavior, cognition, and emotion. Specific units covered include: consciousness, sensation and perception, thought and language, human development, personality, social psychology, abnormal psychology, and the realization of human potential.

 

SOC2000       Social Problems and Policy

A survey of important social problems confronting Americans today, their causes, and solutions. Particular attention is directed toward understanding how and why social problems are created and the controversies surrounding them.

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