Sustainability at HPU

 

Sustainability-focused Courses from HPU's 2011-2013 Academic Catalog 

 

ANTH 3115

Culture, Religion, and the Environment

Western and non-Western cultural and religious per­spectives on the relationships between people and the environment.

 

ANTH 3580

Impact of Tourism on Local Culture

The study of the impact of tourism upon the cultures where it has developed. Case studies are presented to il­lustrate these influences, with particular emphasis given to the Pacific region. Adaptive strategies to create cultural and environmental synergy are also discussed, including management by values, proactive cultural ecology, and compatible destination community development.

 

BIOL 1500

Conservation Biology

An introductory undergraduate course designed to in­troduce students to the biological sciences. The course will emphasize the nature of biodiversity, the growing threats to biodiversity, and ecologically sound conser­vation and resource management practices designed to slow its loss.

 

BR 1011, 1012, 1013

Global Issues

This series of course modules develops an awareness of selected concepts which underscore contemporary issues of global concern. In project-based coursework, students examine topics, careers, people, history and geographical regions pertaining to the themes of foreign aid, emigrational dynamics, intercultural regulations and environmental degradations. Students are required to stay informed of current world news stories through following various national and international news sources. Students also undertake a modest research project based on second­ary sources, writing their findings in a short essay using APA documentation.

 

BIOL 3010

Hawaiian Natural History

The unique biota in marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats of the Hawaiian Islands: evolutionary history, ecology, and human impacts on Hawaiian ecosystems are focuses.

 

CHEM 1020

Introduction to Chemistry and the Environment

A one-semester introduction to chemistry for students with a major or minor in environmental studies. The course will stress basic chemistry with applications that relate to the environment and set chemistry in its political, economic, social, and ethical context.

 

CHEM 1021

Introduction to Chemistry and the Environment Laboratory

Laboratory component of CHEM 1020. This course will introduce and develop principles of quantitative and qualitative techniques and safety awareness and appropri­ate safety precautions. Laboratory experiments will be related to material covered in lecture and/or experimental techniques that are valuable tools for chemists.

 

ECON 1010

Introduction to Global Economic Issues

This course will introduce students to the economic forces and controversies behind globalization. It will also pro­vide background to students for an increased awareness and sensitivity to multicultural communities. Students are expected to develop skills for critical analysis of the elements of prosperity, sustainability, and conflict.

 

ECON 3430

Environmental Economics

Economic principles applied to the analysis of con­temporary environmental problems and their potential solutions.

 

ED 6310

Culturally Responsive Education in Hawaii

This course utilizes culturally responsive principles of teaching and learning, expert guest speakers from the Hawaiian community, guided reflection, critical discourse, and the practical application of the Na Honua Mauli Ola Hawaiian Cultural Pathways for Healthy and Responsive Learning Environments to the design of a culture-based unit plan. Participants in this course experience the land, history, culture and language of Hawai'i to develop peda­gogical practices that support the learning and well-being of Hawai'i's children.

 

ENVS 1030

Tropical Ecology and Sustainability

This summer General Education course consists of a travel component to Costa Rica. After an introduction to the issues and questions pertaining to sustainability and the impact of humans on tropical ecosystems, students will examine how human values and choices affect ecosystems and develop their own perspectives on sustainability from in-country experiences.

 

ENVS 3010

Environmental Impact Analysis

Methods of assessing and predicting physical, chemical, biological, social, and economic impacts on the envi­ronment resulting from human activities. The course includes preparation and review of environmental impact reports.

 

ENVS 3030

Earth Systems and Global Change

Natural and human-induced variability and change in the earth environment on a global scale. Interactions among lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, ecosphere, and the human dimension of global change.

 

ENVS 3200

Photovoltaic Systems Design

This course introduces the fundamental principles of solar energy and photovoltaic systems design. It includes the design of a safe, code-compliant photovoltaic system and preparation of permit-quality technical drawings. The course provides the skills suitable for a supervised, entry level position in the photovoltaic industry, as specified by the North American Board of Certified Energy Prac­titioners (NABCEP).

 

ENVS 4040

Sustainable Building Science

This course examines the fundamentals of integrated building design, including the history, science, and technology of green building. Emphasis is placed on the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system and this course helps prepare stu­dents to obtain one of the U.S. Green Building Council's credentials (LEED Green Associate or LEED Accredited Professional).

 

ENVS 4100

Society and Environment: Contemporary Issues Seminar

A critical analysis of contemporary environmental issues that face society. The course includes formal seminars, informal group discussions, and a comprehensive review paper.

 

ENVS 4200

Business and Environment: Contemporary Issues Seminar

A critical analysis of contemporary environmental management issues. The course includes formal semi­nars, informal group discussions, and a comprehensive review paper.

 

ENVS 4300

Advanced Photovoltaic Systems Design

This is an advanced course in photovoltaic systems de­sign for people considering a career in the solar electric industry. The detailed design of stand-alone and utility-interactive photovoltaic systems is covered with emphasis on compliance with the National Electric Code. Both residential and small commercial/institutional systems are covered (up to 30 kW). This course is based, in part, on the knowledge typically required of industry practitioners as specified by the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) and can help in preparation for the NBCEP PV installer certification exam.

 

ENVS 6010

Global Climate Change

This course discusses the history of the Earth’s climate since its formation to the present time. Focus will be placed on natural mechanisms that cause large-scale, global climate change, from the long-term to the abrupt, and how anthropogenic climate change fits into this context.

 

ENVS 6030

Sustainable Energy Systems

This course examines energy systems, including resource estimation, environmental effects and economics. The current mix of energy sources and technologies are exam­ined along with sustainable options, with an emphasis on quantitative analysis based on scientific principles (ther­modynamics and kinetics). Sustainable energy options examined include nuclear energy, biofuels, hydropower, ocean, geothermal, wind and solar energy.

 

ENVS 6040

Sustainable Building Science

This course examines the fundamentals of integrated building design, including the history, science, and technology of green building. Emphasis is placed on the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system and this course helps prepare students for obtaining one of the U.S. Green Building Council’s credentials (LEED Green Associate or LEED Accredited Professional).

 

ENVS 6050

Watershed and Wetland Systems

An integrated view of ecological systems. An introduction to concepts in geomorphology, hydrology, biogeochemis­try, primary production, carbon cycling, and abiotic and biotic controls on nutrient cycling. Emphasis on research investigating the effects of natural and anthropogenic stressors on ecological resources at multiple spatial and temporal scales, development of indicators of watershed/wetland condition, and comparative values of ecological systems.

 

ENVS 6150

Environment, Power and Society

With the publication of Environment, Power, and Soci­ety in 1971, H.T. Odum changed the lives of countless individuals; altering their worldviews by starting them along a quantitative, systems-oriented path toward holistic thinking. This course will introduce the Energy Systems Language, a visual mathematics capable of representing the details and bringing into focus the complexities of any system, and through the macro scope, his tool for eliminating detail and gaining an overview of the entire system. For many, the concepts in Environment, Power, and Society are profound ideas and methods that clear away much of the mystery about integrating nature and humanity to the benefit of both.

 

ENVS 6200

Advanced Photovoltaic Systems Design

This is an advanced course in photovoltaic systems de­sign for people considering a career in the solar electric industry. The detailed design of stand-alone and utility-interactive photovoltaic systems is covered with emphasis on compliance with the National Electric Code. Both residential and small commercial/institutional systems are covered (up to 30kW). This course is based, in part, on the knowledge typically required of industry practitioners as specified by the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP) and can help in preparation for the NBCEP PV installer certification exam.

 

GEOG 2000

Introduction to Human Geography

An introduction to the concepts and major topics of hu­man geography. This course uses a dynamic, hands-on approach to explore concepts such as mapping techniques, regions, diffusion, population growth, migration, regional and global economic development, growth of cities, cul­tural landscapes, market areas, and the human impact on the environment.

 

GEOG 3720

Population Dynamics

This course begins with historical growth, current trends, and future projections of global population distributions and their resource needs. The course then moves to its core emphasis on the major components of human population change, namely fertility, mortality, and migration. Special attention is given to the role of population structure as a predictor of political instability.

 

GEOG 3730

Economic Geography

An analysis of human economic activities in relation to resources; spatial dimensions of economic systems; social and environmental consequences of location decisions; and alternative use of resources.

 

GEOL 4010

Contaminant Hydrogeology

This course examines theoretical and practical consider­ations of the fate and transport of contaminants through porous geologic materials. Topics include physical and chemical processes governing the transport of con­taminants in groundwater; multiphase flow; chemistry of organic and inorganic contaminants; microbial deg­radation of contaminants; monitoring and mediation site characterization; remediation technologies; application of hydrogeologic and geochemical theory and practice to the protection of aquifers from contaminations; quantitative aspects (computer modeling of contaminant transport).

 

GEOL 6010

Contaminant Hydrogeology

This course examines theoretical and practical con­siderations of the fate and transport of contaminants through porous geologic materials. Topics include physical and chemical processes governing the trans­port of contaminants in groundwater; multiphase flow; chemistry and microbial degradation of organic and inorganic contaminants; monitoring and remediation site characterizations; remediation technologies; application of hydrogeologic and geochemical theory and practice to the protection of aquifers using quantitative methods and computer modeling.

 

GLSD 6000

Sustainable Human Systems

Students will learn to think systematically through the study of the systemic structure and values that underly­ing the modern world view. Alternative, emerging world views focused on sustainable structures will be empha­sized. Systems thinking and a systems perspective will be developed through the study of environmental, cultural, and social systems. A critical perspective is emphasized throughout the course.

 

GLSD 6001

Power and Social Systems

This course will focus on the relations between stakehold­ers' interests, conflict, and power in large organizations and other human social systems. Power models and dynamics in the cultures of nations, communities, corporations, and small groups will be examined. Creative problem solving and reconciliation approaches are presented as means for effective and sustainable social transformation. A written critical analysis of existing power relationships in the social system of the students' choice will be required. Cases, exercises, group discussions are used throughout the course.

 

GLSD 6005

Research Methods for Environmental and Social Policy Formation

Students will learn to conduct and evaluate environmental and social science research design, data quality, quality of reasoning, judgments in interpretation of evidence and alternative interpretations of environmental and sustain­ability research. Emphasis will be placed on the design and generation of evidence acquired by interview, focus group, field research, and other approaches as used in environmental science and sustainability research. Small research teams will design and conduct a multi-faceted pilot study on some contested environmental or social issue related to sustainability using one or multiples of the following: survey research, action research, environmental impact assessments, environmental audits, case studies, in-depth interviews, focus groups, sustainability audits, organization environmental assessments, and campus sustainability audits.

 

GLSD 6500

Ecological Economics and Sustainable Development

This course addresses the topic of sustainable development focusing on economics at the interface of nations and the global economy. Students will complete a comprehensive study of the emerging field of ecological economics and contrast/compare it to the neoclassical economic model of development. Students will conduct an in-depth analysis of a developing nation in terms of economic development based on population, agriculture, industrial development, and natural capital (ecosystem goods and services). Students will be required to propose policy options for sustainable development within a nation and provide a means by which the nation's development will move towards global sustainability.

 

GLSD 6920

Special Topics in Global Leadership and Sustainable Development

The title, content and prerequisites for this course will vary with instructor and need in the MAGLSD program. The course may be repeated when the title and content have changed.

 

GLSD 6950

Globalization, Environment, and Sustainability De­velopment Practicum

The GLSD 6950 Practicum offers students the opportunity to integrate the theoretical knowledge of sustainability, environmental policy/science, or sustainable development with practical experience in either a research project or an organizational employment setting related to their MAGLSD studies. The practicum goal is to allow students to gain practical, first hand experiences in sustainability and greater awareness of career possibilities that lie be­fore them upon graduation. A practicum may or may not receive compensation. Hosting organizations will have agreed to provide practicum students with an intellectually challenging primary task related to their studies. In turn, each practicum experience will be design to benefit the host institution as well.

 

HUM 4500

The World Problematique

An interdisciplinary course on how the humanities (his­tory, literature, philosophy, art, etc.) have shaped our world views and how the humanities can offer critical tools for addressing the problems facing the world today. Instruc­tors may focus on a particular theme such as civilization, the environment, social and ethical concerns, etc.

 

MARS 6010

Toxicology and Stress Responses in Marine Com­munities

Marine pollution is a problem that degrades habitat and exacerbates all other anthropogenic impacts to the marine environment. Using a case-study approach, this course explores 1) major types of marine pollution 2) the dynam­ics of specific classes of contaminants, 3) principles that influence toxicity of contaminants in major marine phyla, 3) diversity of metabolic and clearance mechanisms, and 4) impacts at the community and ecosystem levels.

 

MARS 6400

Marine Conservation Biology

This course provides an overview of the theory and prac­tice of marine conservation. Lectures and assignments emphasize the conceptual foundations and demonstrate the practical use of demographic analyses and computer simulations. An independent project gives students experi­ence in critical thinking, communication skills and the use of science in effective decision making.

 

MGMT3100

Business in Contemporary Society

This course is a study of concepts, issues, and themes surrounding the dynamic relationship between business and society, and their impact and influence on each other. Student's knowledge of business and management are enhanced with a focus on understanding the role and influence of the various business stakeholders, learning about the environmental forces affecting the organization and its stakeholders, and integrating these concepts in formulating socially responsible business policies and strategies.

 

MGMT3600

Natural Resource Management

Sound management principles applied to limited resources such as energy, water, and food.

 

NSCI 2000

"Lessons" for Building Sustainable Communities

This course will allow students to develop critical thinking skills in a real world environment. Students will refine these skills by addressing concrete community concerns through hands-on problem solving through the application of a science-based approach to generate evidence–based sustainable solutions. This course will involve team prob­lem solving and mentoring by upper-division students (see NSCI 3000). This course is designed to introduce students to investigating the sustainability of the HPU and local Hawaii communities and to identifying potential solutions to the problems these communities face.

 

NSCI 3000

Building Sustainable Communities

This course will allow students to develop critical think­ing skills in a real world environment. Students will have an opportunity to refine these skills by addressing concrete community concerns through hands-on problem solving and the application of a science-based approach to generate evidence-based sustainable solutions. This course is designed to draw students into investigating the sustainability of the HPU and local Hawaii communities and, in perceiving the problems these communities face, to work with them to develop sustainable solutions for their concerns.

 

NUR 2940

Health Promotion and Education

An introduction to the principles of health teaching that integrates physical, psychological, spiritual, devel­opmental, and social dimensions within a cultural and environmental context. Emphasis is placed on promoting healthy behaviors that are consistent with the client's health beliefs and practices. Students will apply health teaching and transcultural nursing theory and concepts in a community service-learning project.

 

OC 6441

National and Community Change and Development

National and community-level change and development is being experienced in almost every area of our contem­porary world. Resolving ethnic and religious conflicts, developing market economies for global competition, resource acquisition, technology transfer, education, and creating new approaches to governance are some of the related issues. This course presents a holistic perspective on the issues of change and development at the macro levels of government and community organization. Mod­els for change and development are reviewed as well as their applications in various human and environmental contexts. Specifically, change and development initiatives in economic development, public health improvement projects, stakeholder reconciliation, urban and environ­mental planning and educational programs are reviewed and analyzed.

 

PHIL 3651

Environmental Ethics

An examination of ethical issues in the resolution of conflicts between individual and societal needs and wants and environmental well-being.

 

REL 4002

Religions, Sustainability, and Globalization

Course examines the critical links between religion, sus­tainability, and globalization. Students will be acquainted with the impact of religious teachings on sustainability and with the impact of globalization on religious traditions. Students will examine how religious ideologies generate views of ecosystems and our place in them, as well as reli­gion’s influence on applied ethics in a shrinking world.

 

REL 6002

Religion, Sustainability, and Globalization

This course will address two broad but interrelated sets of topics. The first is a comparison of traditional religious teachings regarding our place on earth, farming, animals, commerce, as well as cooperation and competition with outsiders. The other set deals with the changes in these attitudes subsequent to globalization.

 

SOC 3650

Global Systems and Development

The content of the course focuses upon development and social change in global systems. A combination of international conditions and domestic endowments explain strategies for economic development and social change in different countries and are documented with case studies. Additional units covering global social problems complete the global view. Issues of poverty, human rights, gender, population growth, environment, war and militarism, global media, survival of indigenous peoples, racial/ethnic conflicts, global crime, and world health are included.