Global Learning Program

Global Learning First Year Seminars

Fall 2013 Global Learning Opportunities for New Freshmen

These seminars are special sections of courses reserved for new freshmen that fulfill general education requirements and offer special learning opportunities to develop global perspectives , explore Hawai‘i and engage with the local community , participate in co - curricular activities in conjunction with classroom learning , and reflect on what it means to be a global citizen.

  • Seminars are limited to approximately 15 students so that you can really get to know your professor and your classmates
  • Field trips will give you the chance to learn more about Hawai`i
  • Learning about school services, student organizations, and campus activities will enrich your academic and social life

Very Important - Just take one First-Year Seminar!

The seminars can be identified in the course schedule by “FY ” as part of the section designator. For example, WRI 1000 A is a regular section, while WRI 1 000 T FY is a First - Year Seminar. Since e ach course below is also offered in several regular sections, make sure you sign up for one of the specific sections listed below. Although you may be taking several of the courses (for example BIOL 1000 , PHIL 1000 and WRI 1100) sign up for ONLY ONE FY section and take regular sections of the others.

MWF means the class meets Monday, Wednesday, Friday, MW classes meet on Mondays and Wednesdays and TR means the class meets Tuesday, Thursday

To register electronically, you will need the following:

1. Discipline abbreviation and course number;
2. Course section (“FY” stands for First-Year Seminar);
3. Course Record Number [CRN] a unique 4-digit number shown in brackets for each section.

This fall, new freshmen can take ONE seminar in one of the following subjects, also called disciplines (abbreviations shown below):

BIOL 1000 BFY Introduction to Biology
CRN 1009 MWF 9:40-10:45 Angela J Costanzo (Global Systems A)

The course includes topics such as cellular structure and function, metabolism, mitosis and meiosis, protein synthesis, evolution, animal diversity, anatomy and physiology, ecology, and conservation biology. It also focuses on a variety of ways for students to become more responsible members of their local and global communities. It lays a strong foundation for students to examine and research their options to make healthier ethical and sustainable choices in their everyday lives; from what products they purchase to what they consume on a daily basis. Students will investigate their individual ecological footprints on their natural environment and resources as well as explore new biotechnology and advances in science. Throughout the semester students will view & discuss online and other current biology related media, participate in class activities (in and outside of the classroom), hear from guest speakers and have many opportunities for expanding their knowledge in science by attending Viewpoint Films, completing a research project and summarizing current articles in science.

COM 1000 EFY Introduction to Communication Skills
CRN 2153 TR 12:30-13:55 Marianne Luken (Communication Skills B)
This course integrates principles of interpersonal communication with an introduction to career planning. Course topics are selected to increase students’ self-awareness and self-esteem while building skills for effectively dealing with common interpersonal challenges. Public speaking and group communication skills are introduced to enhance students’ preparedness for typical requirements in their HPU curriculum and professional life. The course stresses both theory and practical applications of effective communication. Community building and whole-brain learning techniques ensure students’ interactive participation in the process of learning and personal development

CSCI 1041 BFY and CFY Digital Literacy in a Global Society
CRN 1838 ( BFY) TR 10 :5 0 - 12:15 Curt Powley (Global Systems C)
CRN 2756 (CFY) TR 15:40 - 17:05 Natural and Computational Sciences, Staff (Global Systems C)

This course gives students tools to be active participants in today’s global culture of digital literacy. Students acquire technology skills to create digital products such as spreadsheets, presentations, and podcasts; analytical skills to understand, organize, and analyze numeric and graphic data; communication skills to convey information in a context appropriate to the receiving audience; and knowledge of international standards and treaties that govern rights and responsibilities in creating and disseminating original works. The course is presented in a global context with local details drawn from a variety of countries and cultures.

INTR 100 0 FYS The International System
CRN 2667 MWF 9:40 - 10:3 5 Dr. James Primm (Global Systems C)
This course introduces students to some of the most important and recent thinking on the new international system. How should we think about this new world that is marked by the integration of globalization and the division of terrorism and genocide? Students will be introduced to several of the major works by well known thinkers on both previous global systems and new views of what the present and future global system will be. Possible topics explored can include global ideoloical conflict, the spread of liberalism, the clash of civilizations, imperial systems, the rise of Asia and the decline of the West, etc.

PHIL 1000 AFY Introduction to World Philosophies
CRN 1828 TR 9:10 - 10:35 Dr. Matthew Lopresti (Values and Choices C)
A general introduction to world philosophies including: Islamic, Western, Hindu, Buddhist, Taoist, and Confucian philosophies. Philosophical problems such as the existence of God and the problem of evil, justice, free will, and our knowledge of the external world will be considered. The course will explore cross-cultural approaches to ancient questions such as “Who am I?” “What is duty?” and “How ought I to act?” Includes field trips to artistic, religious, and cultural sites.

PSY 1000 DFY Introduction to Psychology
CRN 2674 MWF 10:45 - 11:40 Dr. Michael Erickson (Research and Epistemology C)
An introductory course in psychology, covering the major processes underlying human behavior, cognition, and emotion. Specific units covered include: consciousness; sensation and perception; thought and language; human development; personality; social psychology; abnormal psychology; and the realization of human potential. This First Year Seminar will also explore the relevance of psychology to everyday life of self, others, and the larger context of communities.

REL 1000 AFY Introduction to World Religions
CRN 3072 W 17:15-20:10 Dr. Margo Kitts (World Cultures A)
All religions ask and attempt to answer life's biggest questions: Why am I here? Why must I die? What is the meaning of life? This course focuses on religious stories, which pose and attempt to answer those questions from the perspective of indigenous traditions, western traditions and eastern traditions. Whatever the ultimate sources of any religion (e.g., divine or human), religions in this course are studied as human products responsive to historical contexts. Thus we envision rituals, myths, theological ideas, drama, poetry, art, etc., not as representing static systems of belief, but as cultural expressions, which evolve over time. However, because religious histories are enormous and complex, and because we have only one semester to cover the subject, our focus in REL 1000 will be on founding stories and the way they resonate among people across cultures. If you like old stories, this is a course for you.

WRI 1100 TFY and VFY Analyzing and Writing Arguments
CRN 1836 TR 9:10-10:35 Dr. Kathleen Cassity (Communication Skills A)
The course provides instruction and practice in college-level writing tasks, particularly the writing of arguments; this First-Year Seminar section will offer students the opportunity to approach college-level academic writing using creative methods. Students will explore topic possibilities that engage their interest through brainstorming and freewriting, and will learn to shape their ideas into critically astute, well-written, rhetorically effective arguments, using a process that includes drafting, peer workshops, and deep revision. Students will also analyze and respond to the arguments of others and will develop their research skills. Each student will have at least two individual conferences with the instructor. Expect to work closely and collaboratively with both instructor and peers in a diverse, collegial, interactive learning community.

WRI 1100 7 FY Analyzing and Writing Arguments
CRN 3125 TR 9:1 0 - 1 0:3 5 Dr. David Mauricio (Communication Skills A)
The course provides instruction and practice in college-level writing tasks, particularly the writing of arguments, but will also introduce strategies for research and integration of ideas from other sources. Students will explore topic possibilities that engage their interest through analytical observation, brainstorming and freewriting, and will explore strategies for creating well-written and rhetorically effective arguments. Using a process that includes drafting, peer workshops, and deep revision, students will also analyze and respond to the arguments of others. Each student will have at least two individual conferences with the instructor. Expect to work closely and collaboratively with both instructor and peers in a diverse, collegial, interactive learning community.


QUESTIONS?

firstyear@hpu.edu