English Faculty Readings

Patrice Wilson reading at a Faculty Reading

Each semester three different English Department faculty members are invited to read from their published work or from work-in-progress at a reading open to the campus community. It takes a cycle of at least three semesters to give all of our talented poets, playwrights, and prose writers a chance to share their work.    Here's a look at some of the recent programs.

 

 

 

 

Fall 2012 Reading  October 15 12:55-1:50 Warmer Auditorium

On October 15, three faculty authors read their work to a good-sized crowd in Warmer Auditorium, thanks to the English Department, its Events Committee, and Ms. Angela Gili, who organized the event on their behalf.

Church FlagSeaturtle

So what do the above three images have to do with this?

The first reader, Patrice M. Wilson, PhD, read poetry about her recent experience of going back to her church.  The second reader, Kathy Cassity, PhD, read from a humorous creative non-fiction piece set in England and having to do with her family.  The third reader, Ms. Nina Buck, engaged several colleagues in a dramatic reading of her hilarious play titled “The Last Turtle on Earth.”

Obviously the variety itself fulfilled its potential for a well-rounded experience for the audience, who also enjoyed free pizza.  Keep an eye out for a reading of this kind each semester—who knows what the subjects will be next time!

Spring 2012 Faculty Reading Well-Attended  

AndrewGodefroy,EveYoungdale,andTylerMcmahon 

Andrew Godefroy, Eve Youngdale, and Tyler McMahon

On Wednesday, March 14, fifty persons attended the English Department Faculty Reading, featuring Tyler McMahon, Eve Youngdale, and Andrew Godefroy. Mr. McMahon red from his current novel published by St. Martin’s Press this year, titled HOW THE MISTAKES WERE MADE. The story is about a woman who was famous during the beginning of the grunge era of music in Seattle in the 80s. She works with a new musical group in the 90s called the Mistakes—and she makes some understandable mistakes of her own. Eve Youngdale read from her poetry thesis for her MA at UH. Some of them were about her family environment and about nature. Andrew Godefroy read from a poignant short story about a father and daughter who had just lost their wife/mother in a car accident. All three readers teach in the English Department, Mr. McMahon teaches full-time and the other two are valuable members of our adjunct faculty. Everyone enjoyed the reading, and we are all looking forward to the next Faculty Reading in the Fall.

Fall  2011 Faculty Reading

Faculty readers fall 2011

Deborah Ross, Angela Gili (organizer and emcee), and Patrice Wilson (not pictured: Adele NeJame)

On Wednesday, October 12 from 3 to 4pm, three English Faculty members read from their own creative work to an audience of about 30 students and other faculty. Dr. Patrice Wilson read from some recently published poems as well as from her chapbook, A Different Current, which is about color, as in race. She read a couple of poems about her two grandfathers, and ended with a semi-humorous poem commenting on the old saying, “You can’t have your cake and eat it too.” Dr. Deborah Ross next read a humorous piece inspired by a summer of watching TV; the piece echoes and pokes fun at many different types of ads you hear and see on TV. These ads urge your to “order now” or “act fast” because your “time is limited”; the piece ends with that final ominous observation. Finally, Professor Adele NeJame read from her book The South Wind, which was published in August. Her poems were longer, reflective pieces about Lebanon—she is of Lebanese origins—where she had visited in the past few years. Her poetry conveys somber and sensitive responses to, among other topics, the war in Lebanon, and is full of imagery as well as a soft, often sad, but urgent tone. The English Department sponsors a Faculty Reading every semester. We hope you will consider coming to these and enjoying the rich offerings of our talented faculty, as well as the complimentary refreshments provided.